To Victims of KL Warschau [10]

To Victims of the KL Warschau Concentration Camp

Subject: no
Face value: 10 pln
Alloy: 925/1000 Ag
Diameter: 32 mm
Weight: 14.14 g
Finish: standard
Mintage: 11000 pcs
On the edge: smooth
Additional: oxidized
Date of issue: 2020-12-08
Issue price: 150 pln
The reverse of the coin features their outline. This was a heroic struggle for the freedom and dignity of the Jewish and Polish prisoners held in the camp. They are shown wearing concentration camp striped uniforms with identification numbers sewn on. The striped uniform motif is presented on both sides of the coin.

Designer: Dominika Karpińska-Kopiec
The obverse of the coin features brick-built barracks and the wall of the concentration camp preserved in photographs taken by insurgents on 5 August 1944. A broken barbed wire and the symbol of Fighting Poland accurately convey the emotions associated with the liberation of Gęsiówka by the insurgents in August 1944.

Designer: Dominika Karpińska-Kopiec

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Article linked with this coin

To Victims of the KL Warschau Concentration Camp

The Konzentrationslager Warschau (KL Warschau) was set up in the heart of the Polish capital at the time of the bloody German occupation during the 2nd World War. The victims of the KL Warschau included both Jewish prisoners transported from the KL Auschwitz-Birkenau and Poles – mostly citizens of Warsaw – who were killed in the mass executions in 1943–1944. The camp extended over a large area in the city centre, colloquially referred to as “Gęsiówka”. The term derived from the oldest part of the camp located in the former military barracks in Gęsia Street in Warsaw, to be renamed in the post-war period as Mordechaja Anielewicza Street after one of the leaders of the Jewish uprising in the Warsaw Ghetto in 1943. The corpses of the murdered prisoners were incinerated ...

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